What to Expect in Federal Court

I get asked a lot about Federal Court – what it looks like, how it works, and especially how it differs from the more familiar environment of state court. To many of my clients, the very notion of Federal Court looms large and mysterious, like some kind of terrifying cross between the Supreme Court and a galactic tribunal. So I want to devote a quick post to dispelling the various mythologies of Federal Court – and some tips on how to prepare for it effectively.

Federal Court, let us be clear, works a lot like state court. The setting, the sequence of arguments, the choreography, even the players are essentially the same. Sure, there is a U.S. Marshal standing in one corner, and the allegations tend to be far more grave, but ultimately the law is the law: navigating its waters successfully simply requires hard work and (ideally) a talented federal criminal attorney. Everything else, from the shabby wood paneling to the placement of the jury, will no doubt look familiar to anyone who has ever clicked past a legal drama on TV.

What makes Federal Court different? The short answer is: depth. Generally the arguments are more intricate, the preparation more involved, and the sentencing can dwarf anything on the state level. This is the Big Leagues, in other words, and there is little to no chance you will get sprung because a cop or state trooper fails to show. Federal cases cost our dear government plenty of money, and as a result the other side is deeply invested in a win.

What you need on your side is a great Texas federal criminal attorney. The law is always changing in Federal Court and the judges are highly demanding, so anything less than the full weight of strong legal counsel simply won’t get the job done. Between indictment, jury trials, bench trials, evidence rulings, sentencing, and appeals, you get plenty of chances to stand up and fight for your freedom. But it all starts with good preparation – and a phone call to a criminal attorney who has been down this road many times before.